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ARK Club’s Flash Mob!

Founder of ARK (Acts of Random Kindness) Club, Sabrina Ma transformed her school with small acts of kindness. The club regularly performs creative random acts of kindness, including a kindness flash mob of smiles, hugs and connection. She started ARK w…

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The Unexpected Beauty of Everyday Sounds

Using examples from birdsong, the natural lilt of emphatic language and even a cooking pan lid, singer-songwriter and TED Fellow Meklit Hadero shows how the everyday soundscape, even silence, makes music. “The world is alive with musical expression,” she says. “We are already immersed.”

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What Future Are You Living Into Being?

This short video is a call to face the unpleasant truth of climate change and global warming. It is a story of hope and a story of loss, the narrator explains, adding that “we don’t create this story by telling it. We create it by living it. So to live a story that combines hope and doom is to walk courageously into the pain of loss, knowing that there’s something worth doing afterward.” He invites us to find that ‘something’ we love enough to walk toward even without knowing the outcome, whether saving the planet because nature is worth saving, or preparing a decent future for our children and their children.

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What Future Are You Living Into Being?

This short video is a call to face the unpleasant truth of climate change and global warming. It is a story of hope and a story of loss, the narrator explains, adding that “we don’t create this story by telling it. We create it by living it. So to live a story that combines hope and doom is to walk courageously into the pain of loss, knowing that there’s something worth doing afterward.” He invites us to find that ‘something’ we love enough to walk toward even without knowing the outcome, whether saving the planet because nature is worth saving, or preparing a decent future for our children and their children.

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The Train Maker

As a child, retired carpenter, Will of California, always wanted a toy train. But, he never got one. Now, he works eight to ten hours at a time to make wooden trains for the neighborhood kids, even those that have moved away. He’s made and given away more than 1,000 trains, modeling kindness for the children who receive the trains. But who gets more joy out of this exchange? 

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The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

Liesl Clark and her family traveled to Nepal on a “quest to find answers.” They returned home with a new perspective on community and a better way of living. Clark saw how the Nepalese cared for each other, insisting on sharing gifts equally upon the populace and taking responsibility for the aging, fragile, and infirm without regard to family ties. She believed these principles could be applied to their area and possibly beyond. With help from her friend Rebecca Rockefeller, Clark began The Buy Nothing Project with a Facebook page and a list of ideals. Their hope was to focus more on community and connections and less on stuff, thereby removing physical wealth from the equation. The project encourages the feeling that we are all connected and that everyone has something to offer. Some cook meals for others. Some collect food growing on trees and vines in public places, food that may often be left to rot. The movement, started from one collective on Bainbridge Island, Washington, now has 450,000 members and counting. Watch this video to learn more of the backstory behind the local gift economies of this experimental social movement sweeping across the globe.

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Portrait of an Artist – Milan Rai

“White butterflies are a process, not an event,” says artist Milan Rai of the simple shapes he places in unexpected and sometimes neglected areas to surprise and delight and transform objects as well as people. Rather than creating art for a gallery, Rai brings his art installations to the city, where people can get close to it, interact with it, allow it to move them. The result is remarkable — the butterflies have spread from Nepal to Scotland to over 15 countries. “Maybe the butterflies remind the people of the little things, maybe it revives their senses that enjoy little things, that is why they connected so well. Likewise, for me, butterflies are love. . . and for others, it’s a part of their story.” Watch this brief interview with Rai and see for yourself what the butterflies mean to you.

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“We Real Cool”

John Ulrich, a student at the Massachusets College of Art and Design, reads Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem, ”We Real Cool,” which speaks to him and his generation in the depressed neighborhood of South Boston where so many young friends and neighbors have taken their own lives. In four verses of two rhyming lines each, the poem evokes rebelliousness, youth, the seven deadly sins, and mortality. “We Real Cool” was written in 1959 and published in Brooks’ third collection of poetry, “The Bean Eaters,” in 1960. Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks (June 7, 1917 – December 3, 2000) was an American poet, author, and teacher who won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1950 for a volume titled “Annie Allen.” Watch and listen as Ulrich recites the poem that tells his story.

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Hiking for Emails

Dr. Mahabir Pun first dreamed of connecting his small mountain village of Nangi to the internet after spending 6 years trekking 4 days every month to check his email. In 2001, he began a tireless campaign to connect his remote region in the Himalayas t…

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